Robot cage fights and flying taxis: leaked documents reveal Saudi Arabia’s plans for its next megacity

The richness of Silicon Valley has enabled some extravagant and mutable projects, but there is nothing that Oil Money can do.

The new report from the Wall Street Journal shares a city proposal built in the city of Neom, the largest mega project in Saudi Arabia. There are more robots than humans, hologram teachers will be genetically educated, and improved students.

The details are shocking. Dystopia novels (AI surveillance cameras everywhere!) And childish imagination (Let's create a robot dinosaur park!). Taken together, the plan reminds me of what nine-year-old dedicated people can get from Minecraft . Yes, the scale and ambition are impressive, but not in real life.

These are, of course, a proposal that American consulting companies like McKinsey and Boston Consulting, who have no incentive to bring Saudi leaders to the planet, have dreamed of. But all the same, they show you how a few trillion dollars of oil will affect your sense of proportion. The main contents of the report of WSJ are as follows.

  • Cloud planting : Neom's planned site is located on the coast and is surrounded by deserts. Spreading clouds to create weather conditions can be used to rain.
  • Dystopia surveillance : Cameras, unmanned aerial vehicles and face recognition will become commonplace in future cities.
  • Genetic engineering : Neom will conduct a genetically modified project. WSJ cited a plan by Softbank, a Japanese giant, to "create a new path of survival to genetic mutations to increase human strength and IQ."
  • Robot [사방] : Robot's "Maid" will do your housework for you. The robot cage fight will be staged for your play;
  • Flying Taxi: "I do not want any roads or pavement, we will fly in 2030!", Said Prince Faustin bin Sultan at the planning meeting. According to another planning document, "Driving is just fun, so we do not have to transport anymore."
  • Fake Month: Details on the already very opaque report are not clear, This could possibly be generated by an unmanned aerial vehicle or it could include live aerial images in space.

  SAUDI-POLITICS-DIPLOMACY-INVESTMENT

Nadhmi al-Nasr is Neom's Chief Executive Officer.
Credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE / AFP / Getty Images

The entire Neom project is clearly attractive. Saudi Arabia's de facto leader, Mohammed bin Salman, first announced in 2017, hopes to attract "the greatest heart and the best talent in the world". WSJ Bin Salman, "Neom imagined the world's largest city by GDP and wanted to understand what could be gained with up to $ 500 million of investment."

This project is part of the Saudi Arabian Flag of economic diversification plan. From oil. MBS and other Saudi leaders who know this revenue source can not last forever and are keen to develop a city like Neom into a new commercial center. Like the Abdulla economic city, the ambitious project has already failed.

As planned, Neom occupies a Massachusetts-sized area. This includes irregular expansion of giant coastal cities. Outlying towns and villages; Advancing into manufacturing hubs in industries such as biotechnology and robots; It is linked to the international shipping route. Early building work with new airports, palaces and other facilities has already begun.

Anyone can guess whether Neom meets the planner's dream. Many factors have prevented Saudi Arabia from attracting international business so far. WSJ alcohol is prohibited, including social norms that include corruption, a difficult legal system, and immoral and direct immorality to Western visitors. Women's rights are limited. Homosexuality is illegal. ( WSJ reports that Neom may be relieving these tensions.) 19659019] Entire corporations may make you feel depressed. But the desert country, which is desperately trying to turn oil wealth into a technology haven before it's too late, can not symbolically deny the modern world. The dangerous question seems to be nothing: can we buy a new future? Can we save ourselves?

Read the full report in the Wall Street Journal .

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